23 November 2013

turning the page

.
nothing would ever be the same-but she had Life to live.
after the blood stained strawberry pink suit came off-something she wore until she returned to Washington on Air Force One-a widow, Jacqueline Kennedy gave her son a birthday party, orchestrated the most glorious wake in history, and etched her own legacy-and that of her husband into the American psyche. that is all that remains of her Camelot-and a daughter who must be made of steel, a very American metal found in great women across the country-something she must have inherited from her mother-something that gives her the quiet dignity few exhibit in the public eye.

what will we remember 50 years from now? how far away from Camelot will we have wandered?







VOGUE May 1967






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10 comments:

  1. How sad we as an American Society have become enthralled with REALITY SHOWS that depict women of ALL ages acting like cheap imitations of gals with a heart of gold. A certain element has tarnished the motto once taught by Mothers to Daughters as PRIVACY AS THE GREATEST GIFT.
    Morals are a Holy Relic now - worshipped by an ever dwindling few.

    Mrs. Kennedy taught so much. Not just how to bear oneself in the worst of times, but how to enjoy the best of times. OUR NATIONS equal of Empress Joseohine, another who lived in times of Terror and Beauty but who bore her head high even when cast aside.

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  2. well said-on all points. She is quite the example-as you say. pgt

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  3. How far away we have already wandered. I feel the distance cannot be recuperated. But thank you for this reminder of what could have been.

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    1. Heather, yes I agree, except- we can look back. I can not say "our better days are ahead" pgt

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  4. What a beautiful post. And comments from The Swan too, agree totally. I fear that young women of today have so few role models worthy to prepare them for what life holds for them, in joy or sorrow. I am so grateful that I grew up in a time when women were quietly stronger, independent and capable. And could still dance!

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    1. Mrs Black-it's often that the Swan puts here lovely finger on the pulse at little augury. Watching the antics of the young-and famous and the mimicry of them by the young-Or mothers looking like daughters-No one wants things as they are-as They Are. pgt

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  5. Replies
    1. Linnea, I like that-and I agree, especially when that is carried along with dignity. pgt

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  6. Mrs. Kennedy was a role model in so many ways. Her style, grace, self respect and speech and the decibel level of her voice all contributed to the class an elegance of a lady, a woman.
    There are some women who conduct themselves with class. I see many of them who blog. You, P Gaye, are a fine example and thank you for this.



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