06 December 2015

1941






"In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms.


The first is freedom of speech and expression—everywhere in the world.


The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way—everywhere in the world.




The third is freedom from want—which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants—everywhere in the world.

The fourth is freedom from fear—which, translated into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor—anywhere in the world.


That is no vision of a distant millennium. It is a definite basis for a kind of world attainable in our own time and generation. That kind of world is the very antithesis of the so-called new order of tyranny which the dictators seek to create with the crash of a bomb."—Franklin D. Roosevelt, excerpted from the State of the Union Address to the Congress, January 6, 1941



"It is my duty to voice the suffering of men, the never-ending sufferings heaped mountain-high." ~Kathe Kollwitz , German painter, printmaker, and sculptor in the first half of the 20th century.








6 comments:

  1. Words of wisdom for our world still. I wonder if we're any closer to achieving this in the world 70+ years on.

    Thank you for such a thought provoking post.

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  2. Long ago and faraway yet nearer than we think.

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  3. Thank you for giving voice to where we need to focus. Not on bombs and war and hate-filled rhetoric. xoxo Mary

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  4. Your finest moment. The Gift of Fame, bestowed upon your blog...brings a prescient message to those who follow you. If only our Nations Press would follow suit rather than paralyse America nonstop daily.

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