27 August 2010

a little more Coral, & provenance, Mr Worthington.

.
 one of the most beautiful portraits of a child wearing coral is perhaps this-



 son of Rubens, Nicholas Rubens, 1619
Peter Paul Rubens


 after the post on a little bit of Coral.

I found this-



 in my mailbox-
 from-

Toby Worthington. I always enjoy hearing from Toby Worthington, through comment-but even better- an email. We email chatted and  Mr. Worthington said I could share this beautiful Regency children's portrait-with two of the children wearing coral beads-no less. The painting is Mr. Worthington's, of course, and happens to have belonged to the one and only decorator Rose Cumming. I -of course loved the painting, the provenance, the current owner- and the dog- we both agreed- He is perfection.


& this- from Toby's 1980's incarnation of the Rose Cumming painting. The walls are covered in a linen damask- reminiscent of  several Rose Cumming fabrics- I might add. Though we did not discuss this photograph in detail-the chintz looks very much like Rose Cumming too- if not, close. For his part- TW noted the Dorothy Draper retour d'Egypte chair as a particular favorite in the day.




Toby Worthington on the painting:  "The same painting hung in the blue music room at Rose Cumming's last apartment in New York. The Regency Painting~wrongly attributed to Raeburn by Rose and Co.~is plainly that of a young lord with his siblings. There's a Palladian pile in the distance. Apart from that, we haven't a clue who painted it, nor where it originally hung, though it would appear to have been done around 1810 or later. Seeing it in that vast  drawing room of Mrs. Petrasch, in Adam Lewis's recent book, The Great Lady Decorators, indicated that Rose initially acquired the picture for her client, then afterward it became her own. "



Rose's Blue Music Room


the Petrasch Living Room



he added, "Probably not terribly interesting in an of itself, but fascinating to one who has lived with the picture for 30 odd years."  
Well,  TW-You know I am-I find if fascinating indeed!
I am along with any reader that visits Little Augury.

Now that coral has new meaning- take note, when next you see one of these.




 to left- from Christie's,a painting by Van Zelven 1605, Netherlands &  at right a portrait by Paul Moreelse




 Portrait of Charles II, Prince of Wales
Justus van Egmont


& in the Egmont painting a coral teething, strung on coral beads (one is shown below)



A George IV silver-gilt coral and bells, Charles Rawlings, London, circa 1820.  six bells hung from serpent heads, with a central band of roses, thistles and other flowers with whistle top and coral teether.(photo Sotheby's catalog from the Property of Mrs Charles Wrightsman : The London Residence.)




 The Sackville Children by John Hoppner, 1797



Portrait of Emily St.Clare by John Hoppner
at the Nelson-Atkins here




more coral anyone?

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26 comments:

  1. coral yes, please add "William Glackens" - There is something about his work, the amount of coral- lured me in.
    pve

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  2. agreed - a note from Toby is always so exciting!! Love the painting and the coral is so charming. I bought myself a piece of coral on an interesting gold mount on a piece of string in Naples, Italy a few years ago when I was there; the local talisman. I haven't worn it in some time, maybe I should be wearing it given the state of things!
    Love how you pieced this together as all your posts -fascinating :-)

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  3. Patricia, I will have to explore Glackens.

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  4. Stefan, I have several pieces, my favorite is a Victorian cross- I do seem to gravitate to it o certain days-and I am somewhat superstitious.

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  5. I personally believe an email WITH ATTACHMENTS from the esteemed Mr. Worthington has more curative powers than cora! Not only is Mr. Worthington an artist, the home he has lovingly created is art itself. It's a good thing coral is viewed as having protective powers. If Rose were to see how beautiful Toby's room is, she'd be seriously pissed! And if anyone could come back to haunt, it might be this character.

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  6. Yes, always a treat, and even in the 80's! a feat!
    & of note-the portrait from the Nelson Atkins. Yes, a haunting my Rose-notice the coral roses in the cart and on the ground, no wonder she could not resist this painting.

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  7. LA. Another excellent posting on coral with a new addition. I always enjoy the comments of TW,as you say. Children and dogs and now, children and coral.What do you have for us next? AW

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  8. Very edifying - well played, Gaye

    All best,

    B

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  9. Barima, why have I not been getting to your updates? I have them in my blogger dashboard, but the name I did not associate with your Mode Parade. Which do you prefer titlewise-as I am adding you to my list of PEOPLE to read. I loved finding your blog and now I know I have missed it. Let me know your preference,for the moment it is Mode Parade. thanks for checking in . pgt

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  10. Gaye, thanks for clarifying everything to do with coral and its significance
    in paintings and portraiture of old. For one mad moment I'd wondered whether Miss Cumming herself had added those necklaces of coral to go
    with one of her colour schemes! Wouldn't put it past her, actually.
    The chintz on the armchair is Lee Jofa's Trentham Hall, by the way. The
    room as seen in the photo has since been simplified, the damask taken
    down~it was very much of its time, I'm afraid, and not necessarily suited
    to an innocent gothic revival cottage.

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  11. love reading your blog; it's always edifying. for a unique view of coral in a society, look into the oba of benin (google image search for starters) and poke around a bit. coral, as it's used traditionally (and royally) in benin is not something you often see so dramatically in a society; there is a long history of reverence for it. (plus, how great a title is "oba of benin" anyway?!)
    i look forward to your future posts. thank you.

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  12. Mr Worthington, truly to edify for you is a treat within itself. I thank you for enriching Little Augury and Me.

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  13. K, much appreciate your comment and I will be heading off to the oba of benin rabbit hole asap.

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  14. Cher Gaye, listing it as Mode Parade - which seems to work, judging from your sidebar - is perfect with me. I'm still utterly touched that you enjoy it

    Mr Worthington, can you be persuaded to write a blog of your own? You're obviously of a knowledgeable persuasion

    All best,

    B

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  15. When I was very young, a print of the Rubens drawing was the very first one to captivate my attention and encourage me to begin looking at a lot of art in person. Such an elegant thing. Thanks for including it.

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  16. have enjoyed reading your posts on coral and love the paintings you chose. was over at galleria borghese's site and saw the Piero della Francesca you had in the previous coral post, and it reminded me i should leave a comment to let you know how much i enjoy reading your blog.

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  17. Fascinating and gorgeous! I love your blog, very refreshing, I didn't realize there were intellectual blogs that combined such style and knowledge, lovely! Will definitely be following!

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  18. You have me doing lots of research. As an Art History student (a long long long time ago), I am now fascinated by your posts on coral. Thanks!

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  19. Author- isn't it fascinating what will spark a child's interest, and the words of encouragement that accompany them.

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  20. I'm planning to snap and send to you a photo of a Madonna col Bambino in my local museum where Bambino wears coral beads and holds a malocchio. There's also a lovely pomegranate and gorgeous brocade fabric. I'll try to get it to you this week.

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  21. Lush Bella, glad to have your comments, I want to visit your blog too.

    Shari- I thank you for that compliment. & likewise to your blog as well.

    I follow many blogs and try to keep up somewhat with reading them, It is a great way to show our support and thanks!

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  22. Bruce, great, I look forward to an upcoming post from you. thanks!

    Townhouse, sounds great!

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  23. Now you've inspired me to bring back out and wear my grandmother's coral necklace. All of your examples are wonderful, and I love the post on Mr. Worthington's painting. Thank you!

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  24. Dear Gaye, another wonderful post. I have to confess I hadn't noticed they were wearing coral. I shall pay more attention in future.

    There's a blog tag over at mine for you, should you wish to take part. Have a great weekend xx

    http://fashionsmostwanted.blogspot.com/2010/08/getting-to-know-you-tag.html

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  25. Christina, I hope everyone will pull out their coral. I am glad you tuned it for this post. I read your post-lots of new CL FMW info-and thank you for the honor. pgt

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